Deductive Reasoning Test Preparation

To help you pass deductive psychometric tests, use these preparation assessments, advice, and solutions to help you increase your score.

Sample deductive reasoning tests - Free

Here you can take our free deductive tests to show you how they work in improving your score.

Free Deductive Reasoning Test

This free deductive reasoning test contains 11 questions and has a time limit of 13 minutes.

Deductive reasoning tests and how they work in the job selection process

Deductive reasoning tests can be challegning and are usually used in jobs that require technical knowledge. We make sure that our practice tests are practice material that helps simulate the experience of a real logical reasoning test. That way you can be a better prepared candidate and will know what to expect. You can try one of our free sample tests above.

Here are screenshots of our deductive reasoning tests:

Deductive reasoning tests and how AssessmentDay can help you

Given that deductive reasoning tests can be difficult, we recommend practice as one of the best ways you can help yourself prepare for your assessment day. Being able to experience the pressure of the time limits, as well as learning from mistakes that you might make on the tests will certainly help ease any anxieites you have about the tests and familiarise yourself with the process.

Tests often paired with deductive reasoning assessments

There are a number of different types of tests that are often paired with deductive reasoning assessments. Typically, these will be inductive, logical and/or diagrammatic. The good news is that oftentimes these tests can have a somewhat similar in their layout and general approach to deductive tests. They do however have subtle and important differences. Given this, we have a quick list of common reasoning tests and their identifying point:

Inductive reasoning:
Inductive reasoning tests have you thinking against the clock as you have to spot patterns from the sequences of images or graphics. One has to notice the variables and difference that occur across the sequence. This will involve inductive reasoning and as figure out the patterns in the graphics. You can check out our inductive reasoning tests here:

Diagrammatic reasoning:
Diagrammatic reasoning is a little difference from logical reasoning tests. These tests require you to look at typically ask you to identify the rules governing the diagram. There will be an input and an output flowing from the diagram. Another diagrammatic reasoning test style is two sets of diagrams and you must identify with pattern will be sutiable for a given image.

Deductive reasoning:
Deductive reasoning requires you to look at the clauses and their outcomes. These are explored and discounted in both a positive and negative sense in order to arrive at the only possible outcome without contradicting the given premises. One such example of deductive reasoning is the Sudoku puzzle. You can check out our deductive reasoning tests here:

Deductive Test Takers' FAQs

What is the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning?

Inductive logic and deductive logic are different. Deductive reasoning requires you to look at the clauses and their outcomes. These are explored and discounted in both a positive and negative sense in order to arrive at the only possible outcome without contradicting the given premises. One such example of deductive reasoning is the Sudoku puzzle. On the other hand, inductive reasoning is open and analytic. It is about reaching a general conclusion given one's perception of patterns observed in specific events. Many real-life situations and conversations use inductive reasoning - this is one reason why they inductive psychometric tests are popular with employers.

What are the most common deductive reasoning tests used by employers?

The term deductive reasoning is used only commercially by the test publisher SHL. Other test publishers tend to use other descriptions even though their format may be similar. The best thing to do is contact the employer or company who has invited you to take the test. They are usually very helpful and will likely provide you with at least more information on the nature of the test, or sometimes a few example questions.

  • 1. CEB SHL Verify Ability Tests - SHL (part of CEB) are the largest test publisher in the UK. Their deductive reasoning tests vary slightly in length depending on level: typically around 22-25 minutes. The format involve a variety of slightly different question styles. The first, will be purely verbal. The premises are a sequence of given sentences. The second, will be image driven. The premises may be slightly more abstract or numerical in nature. The third, is indentifying the premieses from a block of text. SHL's Verify range of tests have the option of a follow-up test in which the candidate is asked to re-take a shorter version of their first test. This can be used by the assessor to assess consistency and response patterns, and help identify the risk that the original test had not been completed by the candidate in question.
  • 2. Kenexa Ability Tests - Kenexa are part of IBM and are also a large test publisher. Their deductive reasoning tests typically consist of 20 questions, where one must follow the logic of statements in order to deduce the correct answer. They are very similar in style to SHL. A typical time limit is 20 minutes for 18 questions, but again, this can vary slightly depending on level of the role.